Sir Alan Parker receives Fellowship at BAFTA Film Awards

Sir Alan Parker accepted the prestigious Fellowship at last night’s BAFTA Film Awards, on a night that also saw success for fellow British director Bart Layton.

Parker (pictured) started his career directing commercials, and along with fellow Brits Ridley Scott, Tony Scott, Hugh Hudson and Adrian Lyne, revolutionised the world of broadcast advertising. From there Parker moved into feature film, beginning his career with the perennially popular Bugsy Malone in 1976, and taking in such diverse and acclaimed work as Mississippi Burning, Midnight Express, Evita and The Commitments. Parker was presented the award by Kevin Spacey, with whom he worked on his last film The Life of David Gale.

Layton’s success came in the Outstanding Debut by a British Writer, Director or Producer category, an award he shared with the producer of their hugely well-received documentary The Imposter. The pair beat off competition from The Muppets director James Bobin, Tina Gharavi for I Am Nasrine, Dexter Fletcher and Danny King for Wild Bill, and David Morris and Jacqui Morris for McCullin.

The award for Outstanding British Film went to Skyfall, the first Bond film to win a BAFTA since From Russia with Love in 1964. Sam Mendes’ film overcame Joe Wright’s Anna Karenina, Martin McDonagh’s Seven Pyschopaths, Tom Hooper’s Les Miserables and John Madden’s The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.

Away from British cinema, the Best Director award went to Ben Affleck for Argo, which also took Best Film. Best Documentary went to Searching For Sugarman, directed by Malik Bendjelloul, which beat British films The Imposter, McCullin and Kevin Macdonald’s Marley, as well as West of Memphis, by American director Amy Berg.

Finally, Best British Short went to Swimmer, directed by Lynne Ramsay, and Best Animated Short to The Making of Longbird, by Will Anderson. For the full list of BAFTA winners, please click here.